Sarbanes Oxley Compliance Journal on Ulitzer

Sarbanes Oxley on Ulitzer

Subscribe to Sarbanes Oxley on Ulitzer: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Sarbanes Oxley on Ulitzer: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Sarbanes Oxley Authors: David Sprott, Lori MacVittie, Jim Kaskade, Gilad Parann-Nissany, PR.com Newswire

Related Topics: SSL Journal, Intel XML, Oracle Journal, XML Magazine, IBM Journal, MySQL Journal, CIO/CTO Update, Sarbanes Oxley on Ulitzer

Article

Top Ten Managed File Transfer Considerations

Plain FTP is not secure

Before looking for a managed file transfer solution, it is important to determine how data is currently being transferred from your organization. You should find out what users and applications are performing the data transfers, where the source of the data resides, how sensitive the data is, how the data is formatted for the partners and what protocols are used to transmit the information. If the files are encrypted or compressed before transmission, find out what tools and standards are being utilized.

GoAnywhere Managed File Transfer

After you’ve done your in-house analysis, then start a search for a secure file transfer solution that best fits your needs. Listed below are the Top 10 managed file transfer considerations:

1. Platform Openness – To reduce the points of connection to sensitive data and reduce the risk of exposure to those without a need-to-know the MFT solution should be installed on the server operating system where the sensitive data and applications reside. If your corporate data mostly resides on the IBM i, then it would make sense to get a MFT solution that runs on the IBM i.

2. Authorization Controls – To meet many compliance regulations, the MFT solution must provide role based access to limit user access to certain servers or MFT functions based on user credentials.

3. Secure FTP – Plain FTP is not secure. The MFT solution must support both SFTP (FTP over SSH) and FTPS (FTP over SSL) protocols for secure FTP transfers.

4. Encryption Standards – At minimum, the solution should support the industry standard encryption standards: AES, Open PGP, AS2, SSH, SSL, TLS and S/MIME.

5. Database Integration – The MFT should readily connect to DB2, SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL and other popular database servers for extracting and inserting data.

6. Data Transformation – Is the ability to translate data between popular data formats including XML, CSV, Excel and fixed-width text formats.

7. Data Compression – Compresses and packages data using popular standards such as ZIP, GZIP and TAR to reduce transmission times.

8. Application Integration – The MFT should provide commands and APIs for interfacing with your applications.

9. Scheduling – Allows transfers and other MFT functions to be scheduled for future dates and times.

10. Key Management – Does the MFT include management tools for creating, importing and exporting keys and certificates?

Related Blog Post: What Qualifies a Product as a Managed File Transfer Solution?

Does your MFT go anywhere?

More Stories By Dirk Zwart

Born in Canada and calling Nebraska home, Dirk primarily writes on the Technical side of the IT realm. Having written for years at Gateway Computer and as part of other large IT organizations, Dirk happily writes for Linoma Software. When not writing children's stories or stage scripts, you'll find Dirk out back in the vegetable garden or building yet another server for reasons unknown. Follow Dirk on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.